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Question:


I HAVE EMPHYSEMA IS THEIR ANY CURE IN THE NEAR FUTURE I AM ON AN NIV AND OXGYEN 16 HOURS A DAY AND I FEEL OK
RAY

Answer:

Dear RAY,

Supplemental oxygen used as prescribed (usually more than 20 hours per day) is the only non-surgical treatment which has been shown to prolong life in emphysema patients.

Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can improve the quality of life for certain carefully selected patients. It can be done by different methods, some of which are minimally invasive.

The benefits after Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS) may not last greater than two to three years, however, during this time, select patients may experience significant clinical benefits, and allow safe bridging toward lung transplantation, if necessary.

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center announced the start of the EASE (Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema) Trial, an international, multi-center clinical trial to explore an investigational treatment that may offer a new, minimally-invasive option for those suffering with advanced widespread emphysema.

The study focuses on an experimental procedure called airway bypass designed to create pathways in the lung for trapped air to escape with the goal of relieving shortness of breath and other emphysema.

A study published by the European Respiratory Journal suggests that tretinoin (an anti-acne drug commercially available as Accutane) derived from vitamin A can reverse the effects of emphysema in mice by returning elasticity (and regenerating
lung tissue through gene mediation) to the alveoli.

A landmark research performed at Georgetown University has provided some hope for a cure - a treatment that will regenerate lung tissue. In their work, Drs. Gloria and Donald Massaro tested a derivative of Vitamin A, called all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), on rats suffering from an experimental form of emphysema.

Treatment with ATRA helped regenerate their lungs and restore their damaged lungs and lung function.

500mg of n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) supplements three times a day might help with the symptoms associated with emphysema disease.

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is an amino acid which can help to increase the levels of the powerful antioxidant glutathione in the respiratory track.

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is good at reducing mucus production in the respiratory track and its antioxidant properties can help to protect against lung tissue damage associated emphysema disease.

Two of members of Efforts (EMPHYSEMA FOUNDATION FOR OUR RIGHT TO SURVIVE ) with COPD had umbilical cord stem cell transplants on April 5th of this year and have noticed some improvements already. The treatment injected own cells via IV and umbilical cord stem cells through an IV.

The most used drugs in emphysema clinical trials right now are:

Formoterol
Retinoic acid. The oxidized form of Vitamin A
Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor
Arformoterol tartrate
Budesonide
Fluticasone
Propionate
Beclomethasone dipropionate
Cilomilast

Over the past century, a variety of surgical procedures have been proposed to improve the symptoms and quality of life in patients with severe emphysema, it can be expected that new drugs will be developed in the future in an attempt. to specifically treat airway or parenchymal damage.

A major new government study shows that patients with severe emphysema who undergo bilateral lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) on average do not face an increased risk of death, and are more likely to function better compared to those who receive only non-surgical treatment.

The study also identified specific criteria to determine which patients will benefit from the procedure. The five-year randomized study, known as the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), represents an unprecedented collaboration between the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Medicare, and was the combined effort of 17 clinical research sites.


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