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Question (04/01/2012):

Title: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in torch test.

I'm 16 week and 5 days pregnant.

My gyn at the 6th week suggested me torch test as I had an earlier miscarriage 2 and half years before (I feel the reason was very heavy sex before 3 days of previous miscarriage).

My report is as: rub igg 3.33, igm neg, toxo igg 3.65, igm neg, cmv igg 2.52 and igm neg, hsv igg and igm negative.

On that base the gynecologist prescribed me rovamycin -2 tabs a day, droxyl 500 - 2 tab a days for 10 days only, starmune 1 tab a day, anbuta drops - 10 drops twice a days.

During the 8 th week of pregnancy I have done my usg but my fetus heartbeat was normal 141 bpm and also crl measures 1.4 cm also.

After 2 months I have checked again igg level other than rubella all igg level reduced rub igg level after 2 months is 3.78.

During these 16 weeks and 5 days of pregnancy only one time I had cough and cold but after rest everything was fine no problem at all.

I'm feeling now some days the movement of my baby also.

Further I'm 36 years old and having one healthy baby her age is 8 years.

Also my tsh level is also high i.e. 9.62 but free t3 and free t4 was normal so docs told not to worry.

Please guide me.

I'm getting very nervous because next month I'm going for an anomaly and triple marker test.

Will my baby be normal?

Please help me

Rutuja

Answer:

Dear Rutuja,

High levels of IgG may indicate a long-term (chronic) infection

Normal leves in adults of IgG are 6.4-14.3

You have 3.65 and 3.33

Toxoplasmosis Antibody, IgG

Reference Range:

6 IU/mL or less: Negative - No clinically significant level of Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibody detected.

7-8 IU/mL: Equivocal - Repeat testing in 10-14 days may be helpful.

9 IU/mL or greater: Positive - Significant level of Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibody detected, which may indicate current or past infection.

You have 3.65.

Rubella Antibodies, IgG

Reference Range:

Rubella Antibody, IgG Less than 5 IU/mL: Negative No significant level of detectable rubella IgG antibody.

5-9 IU/mL: Equivocal Repeat testing in 10-14 days may be helpful.

Greater than 10 IU/mL: Positive IgG antibody to rubella detected, which may indicate a current or previous exposure/immunization to rubella.

You have 3.33

CMV IgG antibody

Reference Interval

0.89 IV or less: Negative - No significant level of detectable CMV IgG antibody.

0.90-1.09 IV: Equivocal - Repeat testing in 10-14 days may be helpful.

1.10 IV or greater: Positive - IgG antibody to CMV detected, which may indicate a current or past CMV infection.

You have 2.52

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a member of the herpes virus family. It's the virus most frequently passed on to babies during pregnancy.

When a pregnant woman becomes infected with cytomegalovirus (cmv), she can pass it to her unborn baby.

Although rare, cmv infection can cause the newborn to become very sick, develop lifelong disabilities, or even die.

If a woman gets cmv when she is pregnant, she can pass it on to her baby. cmv does not harm most babies. But some develop lifelong disabilities.

Cmv is spread through close contact with body fluids. You should use good hygiene, including proper hand washing, to avoid catching or spreading the virus.

Most people with cmv don't require treatment. If you have a weakened immune system, your doctor may prescribe antiviral medicine.

Fortunately, the risk of passing the virus to your baby during a recurrent infection is very low (the CDC estimates it to be about 1 percent) and the risk of serious complications is even lower. So if you got your first CMV infection at least six months before you conceived, the risk to your baby from CMV is very small.

However, if you become infected for the first time during pregnancy, the chance of passing the virus to your baby is much higher.


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