[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Answer to your Health Question

Question:


Why I have regular episodes of mechanical low back pain or lumbago?

Leroy

Answer:

Dear Leroy,

The pathophysiology of mechanical LBP or mechanical low back pain (lumbago) remains complex and multifaceted.

Multiple anatomic structures and elements of the lumbar spine (e.g., bones, ligaments, tendons, disks, and muscle) are all suspected to have a role.

Many of these components of the lumbar spine have sensory innervations that can generate nociceptive signals representing responses to tissue-damaging stimuli. Other causes could be neuropathic (e.g., sciatica).

Most chronic LBP or mechanical low back pain cases most likely involve mixed nociceptive and neuropathic etiologies.

The lumbar spine position most at risk for producing LBP is forward flexion (bent forward), rotation (trunk twisted), and attempting to lift a heavy object with out-stretched hands.

Research since the late 20th century suggests that chemical causes may play a role in the production of mechanical LBP (mechanical low back pain or lumbago).

Components of the nucleus pulposus, most notably the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2), have been identified in surgically removed herniated disk material.

This PLA2 may act directly on neural tissue, or it may orchestrate a complex inflammatory response that manifests as LBP or mechanical low back pain.


Do you have any other questions? Enter your health question

[an error occurred while processing this directive]